15 Tips for instant migraine relief

Migraine is one of the most common conditions in the world, according to the Migraine Research Foundation. Migraines can run in families with children and adults known to have them.

In America, the Migraine Research Foundation estimates that almost 12 percent of people suffer from migraine headaches.

We recommend the attending physician.

Migraine headaches are not simply a severe headache. Migraines are part of a neurological condition and often have other symptoms, including:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • tingling or numbness in the hands or feet
  • visual changes
  • sensitivity to sound, light, or smell

Migraines can be debilitating and a chronic condition that can impact daily life for some people.

There are many different medications used to treat and prevent migraines. But some people prefer to use natural treatments as alternatives or to supplement medical treatment.

Natural remedies for migraines

Here are 15 natural remedies for migraines that people may want to try:

1. Acupressure

Acupressure therapy being applied to persons hand and wrist.

Acupressure therapy may help relieve some migraine symptoms.

Acupressure involves the application of pressure to specific parts of the body. Stimulating specific points of the body in this way is believed to release muscle tension and alleviate pain.

One popular pressure point is the LI-4 point in the space between the base of the left thumb and pointer finger.

Applying firm but not painful circular pressure to the LI-4 point, using the opposite hand for 5 minutes, may relieve headache pain.

2012 study looked at 40 people who had migraines without aura. It found that pressure on the PC6 acupoint, which is located three fingers up from the base of the wrist on the inside of the arm, was effective in relieving migraine-associated nausea or vomiting associated with a migraine headache.

2. Diet changes

Many people who get migraines notice certain foods can trigger them.

Common food triggers for migraines include:

  • processed foods
  • red wine
  • alcohol
  • chocolate
  • caffeinated beverages

Being aware of what might be triggering a migraine is critical. Some people use a food diary or migraine journal to keep track of potential triggers.

Changing diet or eating patterns to avoid triggers may help to prevent migraines in the future.

3. Essential oils

Essential oils are often used as natural remedies or as an antimicrobial in homemade cleaning products.

Lavender is an essential oil often recommended as a remedy for stressanxiety, and headaches. Another small study published in European Neurology found that lavender oil inhalation helped reduce the severity of migraine headaches in some people.

The results are encouraging, but further research using larger sample sizes is needed.

4. Ginger

2014 study using 100 participants compared the effectiveness of ginger powder with sumatriptan, a common migraine drug.

The researchers found the effectiveness of ginger was statistically comparable to sumatriptan, and users were as willing to continue with either treatment.

One definite benefit for people who get migraines is that using ginger cannot hurt and, aside from an existing allergy, there are no side effects to using it.

5. Stress management

Person making notes in a journal

Journaling may help relieve stress.

Stress is a common trigger for migraines. Stress can also create a cycle where migraine pain worsens the stress, which then triggers another migraine.

Finding outlets for stress, such as journaling, exercise, or meditation, may help to prevent future migraines.

People can also try taking a stress management class. They may choose to take a warm bath or listen to music, as well, to try to relieve the stress they feel.

By doing these positive actions, a person is choosing to take control of their body’s reaction to the stress in their life.

6. Yoga or stretching

Yoga is thought to help improve blood flow and reduce muscle tension, which can help relieve symptoms for people who get migraines.

comprehensive 2014 study compared conventional migraine treatment with and without the addition of regular yoga practice.

The researchers found that the group who participated in a yoga program had greater relief than the group who joined in conventional treatment alone.

7. Biofeedback therapy

Biofeedback is a therapy that people use to trigger the release and relaxation of tight muscles.

Biofeedback takes practice and training. Sensors placed on the muscles feed into a small machine that gives real-time feedback about muscle tension, allowing users to release the tight areas better.

Placement of sensors along the forehead, jawline, or trapezius muscles in the shoulders can help to target muscles that might be triggering migraine pain.

8. Acupuncture

An extensive 2012 systematic review looked at studies that evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating migraines and other conditions.

The study authors found that acupuncture is an effective treatment choice for people with migraine headaches, although they pointed out that other factors might be playing a part also.

People who are interested in using acupuncture for migraines should make sure to find a licensed practitioner for treatment.

9. Massage

Massaging the muscles in the neck and shoulders can help to relieve tension and alleviate migraine pain. Massage may also reduce stress.

People can choose to use a professional masseuse for a massage. Alternatively, taking a tennis ball and using it to do a self-massage along the shoulders and back is another, more cost-effective, option.

10. Herbal supplements

Herbal supplements

Herbal supplements, such as butterbur, may help reduce migraine frequency.

Butterbur and feverfew are two herbal supplements that may be helpful in reducing migraine pain and frequency. A daily dose of 150 milligrams (mg) of butterbur was effective in lowering migraine frequency when taken for about 3 months, according to the American Migraine Foundation. The foundation suggests feverfew is less effective than a butterbur. Feverfew may, however, be helpful for some people. There are some risks in using these herbs, severe in rare cases, and anyone wanting to try them should speak with their doctor first. Instant migraine relief.

11. Magnesium

Deficiency of magnesium, which is an essential mineral, may trigger migraine aura or a menstrual-migraine headache. A migraine aura is a visual disturbance that occurs at the onset of a migraine. Not everyone who gets migraines will experience a migraine aura. Research has found that supplementation of magnesium can be useful in reducing the frequency of migraines in some individuals. People should speak with their doctor before starting to take magnesium, particularly if they have other health conditions.

Kidney stones and a few tips on how to prevent them.

Once your health care provider finds out why you are forming stones, he or she will give you tips on how to prevent them. This may include changing your diet and taking certain medications. There is no “one-size-fits-all” diet for preventing kidney stones. Everyone is different. Your diet may not be causing your stones to form. But there are dietary changes that you can make to stop stones from continuing to form. Below are some tips.

Diet Changes

Drink enough fluids each day.

If you are not producing enough urine, your health care provider will recommend you drink at least 3 liters of liquid each day. This equals about 3 quarts (about ten 10-ounce glasses). This is a great way to lower your risk of forming new stones. Remember to drink more to replace fluids lost when you sweat from exercise or in hot weather. All fluids count toward your fluid intake. But it’s best to drink mostly no-calorie or low-calorie drinks. This may mean limiting sugar-sweetened or alcoholic drinks.

Knowing how much you drink during the day can help you understand how much you need to drink to produce 2.5 liters of urine. Use a household measuring cup to measure how much liquid you drink for a day or two. Drink from bottles or cans with the fluid ounces listed on the label. Keep a log, and add up the ounces at the end of the day or 24-hour period. Use this total to be sure you are reaching your daily target urine amount of at least 85 ounces (2.5 liters) of urine daily.

Health care providers recommend people who form cystine stones drink more liquid than other stone formers. Usually 4 liters of liquid is advised to reduce cystine levels in your urine.

Tip! Try  Intra Herbal Juice 20 minutes before meals with a glass of an infantile water. We strongly recommend long term usage of Intra and Nutria.

Reduce the amount of salt in your diet.

This tip is for people with high sodium intake and high urine calcium or cystine. Sodium can cause both urine calcium and cystine to be too high. Your health care provider may advise you to avoid foods that have a lot of salt. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and other health groups advise not eating more than 2,300 mg of salt per day. The following foods are high in salt and should be eaten in moderation:

  • Cheese (all types)
  • Most frozen foods and meats, including salty cured meats, deli meats (cold cuts), hot dogs, bratwurst and sausages
  • Canned soups and vegetables
  • Breads, bagels, rolls and baked goods
  • Salty snacks, like chips and pretzels
  • Bottled salad dressings and certain breakfast cereals
  • Pickles and olives
  • Casseroles, other “mixed” foods, pizza and lasagna
  • Canned and bottled sauces
  • Certain condiments, table salt and some spice blends

 

Eat the recommended amount of calcium.

If you take calcium and magnesium supplements, make sure you aren’t getting too much calcium. On the other hand make sure you aren’t getting too little calcium and magnesium either. Talk with your health care provider or dietitian about whether you need supplements. Good sources of calcium to choose from often are those low in salt. Eating calcium and magnesium-rich foods or beverages with meals every day is a good habit. There are many non-dairy sources of calcium, such as calcium-fortified non-dairy milks. There are good choices, especially if you avoid dairy.

You can usually get enough calcium from your diet without supplements if you eat three-to-four servings of calcium-rich food. Many foods and beverages have calcium in them. Some foods and beverages that might be easy to include on a daily basis with meals are:

Magnesium rich foods

Magnesium is an extremely important mineral. It’s involved in hundreds of chemical reactions in your body and helps you maintain good health. Unfortunately, many people don’t reach the recommended daily intake of 400 mg . However, eating foods high in magnesium can help you meet the daily requirement.

Here are 10 healthy foods that are high in magnesium:

Dark Chocolate, Nuts, Whole Grains, Fatty Fish( salmon, mackerel and halibut),  Avokados, Legumes, Seeds, Tofu, Bananas, Leafy greens.

Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables.

Eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily is recommended for all people who form kidney stones. Eating fruits and vegetables give you potassium, fiber, magnesium, antioxidants, phytate and citrate, all of which may help keep stones from forming.

A serving means one piece of fruit or one potato or one cup of raw vegetables. For cooked vegetables, a serving is ½ cup. If you are worried you may not be eating the right amount of fruits and vegetables, talk to your health care provider about what will be best for you.

Eat foods with low oxalate levels.

This recommendation is for patients with high urine oxalate. Eating calcium-rich foods (see table above) with meals can often control the oxalate level in your urine. Urinary oxalate is controlled because eating calcium lowers the oxalate level in your body. But if doing that does not control your urine oxalate, you may be asked to eat less of certain high-oxalate foods. Nearly all plant foods have oxalate, but a few foods contain a lot of it. These include spinach, rhubarb and almonds. It is usually not necessary to completely stop eating foods that contain oxalate. This needs to be determined individually and depends on why your oxalate levels are high in the first place.

Eat less meat.

If you make cystine or calcium oxalate stones and your urine uric acid is high, your health care provider may tell you to eat less animal protein.

If your health care provider thinks your diet is increasing your risk for stones, he or she will tell you to eat less meat, fish, seafood, poultry, pork, lamb, mutton and game meat than you eat now. This might mean eating these foods once or twice rather than two or three times a day, fewer times during the week, or eating smaller portions when you do eat them. The amount to limit depends on how much you eat now and how much your diet is affecting your uric acid levels.

Medications

Changing your diet and increasing fluids may not be enough to prevent stones from forming. Your health care provider may give you medications to take to help with this. The type of stone and the urine abnormalities you have will help your health care provider decide if you need medicine and which medicine is best. Common medications include:

Thiazide diuretics

are for patients who have calcium stones and high levels of calcium in their urine. Thiazides lower urine calcium by helping the kidney take calcium out of the urine and put it back in the blood stream. When taking thiazides, you need to limit how much salt you take in, as these medications work best when urine sodium is low.

Potassium citrate

is for patients with calcium stones and low urinary citrate, and for those with uric acid and cystine stones. Potassium citrate makes the urine less acidic or more alkaline (basic). This helps prevent cystine and uric acid stones. It also raises the citrate level in the urine, helping to prevent calcium stones.

Allopurinol

is frequently prescribed for gout, which is caused by high uric acid in the blood. Allopurinol not only lowers the level of uric acid in the blood but also in the urine, so it may also be prescribed to help prevent calcium and uric acid stones.

Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA)

is for patients who produce struvite or infection stones. These stones form because of repeated urinary tract infections (UTI). AHA makes the urine unfavorable for struvite stones to form. The best way to prevent stuvite stones is to prevent repeated UTIs caused by specific types of bacteria and to completely remove the stones with surgery.

Cystine-binding thiol drugs

are used only for patients who form cystine stones. These medications (d-penicillamine or tiopronin) bind to cystine in the urine and form a compound that is less likely than cystine to crystallize in the urine. This drug is used when other measures fail, such as raising fluid intake, reducing salt intake or using potassium citrate.

Vitamin supplements and kidney stones

should be used carefully as some can increase your risk of forming kidney stones. Your health care provider and a dietitian may be good sources of information about over-the-counter nutritional supplements.

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